Next Generation Oil & Gas Tools | WellDatabase http://welldatabase.com Stop Digging, Start Drilling Sat, 08 Jul 2017 13:56:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 http://welldatabase.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/cropped-SiteInsignia-32x32.png Next Generation Oil & Gas Tools | WellDatabase http://welldatabase.com 32 32 Case Study: Using Shapefiles in WellDatabase http://welldatabase.com/blog/using-shapefiles-in-welldatabase/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/using-shapefiles-in-welldatabase/#respond Wed, 12 Apr 2017 02:33:04 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1394 Potential clients often ask, “How are you different from your competitors?” I can rattle off the usual list, specifically speaking to how much more customizable our software is, but instead ...

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Potential clients often ask, “How are you different from your competitors?” I can rattle off the usual list, specifically speaking to how much more customizable our software is, but instead I thought I should demonstrate one of the many ways you can customize WellDatabase to fit your needs.

Activity has started to pick up, with the largest rig count recovery seen in the Permian Basin. If you’ve followed this activity, you would have noticed all of the M&A that has occurred in Delaware Basin over the last year. One of the many tools used to analyze these opportunities are lease shapefiles. These shapefiles provide a geographical representation of an Operator’s mineral and/or surface lease extents. Having the ability to overlay the leases on a map with well locations will allow you to get an idea of the PDP and PUD. WellDatabase gives you the ability to add your own shapefiles on the map fairly quickly and easily. Below, we demonstrate just how easy it is to upload shapefiles and quickly run an economic case for an area of interest (AOI).

For this example, we started by downloading public lease and geologic feature shapefiles from the GLO1 and University Lands2. They were first uploaded into QGIS3, a free open-source GIS software, to analyze the attributes and coverage in our particular AOI. In addition to the leasing shapefiles, the Permian Basin Geologic Features and Basement Faults shapefiles from University Lands were also downloaded. Adding faults and geologic features to the map can help you anticipate any potential drilling, completions, and production risks in an acreage position.

 

QGIS mapping service with the GLO Active Leases (purple polygons, Fault Basement (red lines), Geologic Features Permian Basin (green transparent polygons), and Texas Abstract layers. Notice the large concentration of leases in the Delaware Basin.

 

Once the shapefiles are edited to your preference, they should be ready to add to the map in WellDatabase. First, we are going to login to a WellDatabase account, go to the Browse > Wells page, and zoom into our AOI. For this exercise we have decided to focus on Reeves and Culberson counties because of the larger density of lease shapefiles for those counties. Next, we will start to filter our data down to horizontal wells with production.

WellDatabase Browse > Wells page filtered to horizontal wells with production in Reeves and Culberson counties.

 

 

The Tools pane contains a variety of features; including Map Overlays, Colorize Groups, and even Bubble Maps. We will use the Map Overlays feature to upload the shapefiles we edited in QGIS. Once you’ve chosen the shapefile you would like to upload, you have the choice to change the fill and line color.

Illustrating how to upload a .shp onto the Map pane. Start by clicking the + next to Map Overlays and select the Shapefile Layer. You will be prompted to choose the file and line and fill color. Once you hit upload, the file will populate onto the map.

 

Red Line = Basement Faults; Black Lines = Permian Basin Geologic Features; Red, Black and Green Points = Well Locations; Blue Polygons = Open Leases.

 

We’ve zoomed into an area at the Reeves/Culberson border, and for this exercise, the blue leases in the image below represent an acquisition opportunity. Lucky for us, there doesn’t appear to be any basement related faulting. To get an idea of what the production is for an average well in this area, select the Type Curve tab. The Type Curve tab takes the production for all the wells on our map and creates a best fit production curve. Because formations vary by depth and producibility, always make sure to filter wells to a specific Producing Formation when running this analysis. Fortunately, all the wells in this region are Wolfcamp producers so we didn’t have to bother with filtering. Included in the Type Curve analysis is the ability to run decline curves for Oil, Gas, and Water (when available). We’ve selected Decline in the Mean Oil drop down and set it to forecast out 5 years using a best fit curve. Once the curve is built, we can run our economic case by clicking the $ button.

 


The Type Curve tab will roll up the production for each well on the map and create an Oil, Gas, and Water type curve. In the Mean Oil drop down you can perform decline curve analysis. Decline curve settings = Best Fit Line, Production Limit = 0, Forecast = 5yrs.

 

 

 

In the Economic Forecast module, you can set your economic benchmarks (i.e: working interest, selling price, etc). In our example, we have the working interest at 100%, selling price at $52, initial capex at $6,000,000, and lease operating cost at $15,000. Based on the oil type curve and decline forecast, the average well in this position will have yet to pay out at 35 weeks and by 80 weeks will have only paid slightly more than $1,000,000 (repeat for Mean Gas). You can easily change the inputs to see at what price and cost an average well in the area meets your economic threshold.

 

Clicking the $ under Decline will open the Economic Forecast module. Here you can run the economics for a well in this region based on the type curve and forecasted decline. At $52 Oil, these wells aren’t very economic.

For any questions or if you would like to request a live demonstration, please email us at info@welldatabase.com. Thanks.


1GLO Active Lease Shapefile: http://www.glo.texas.gov/land/land-management/gis/

2Permian Features and Fault Shapefiles: http://www.utlands.utsystem.edu/GISData.aspx

3QGIS Software: http://www.qgis.org/en/site/index.html

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Before you sign that data contract… http://welldatabase.com/blog/before-you-sign-that-data-contract/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/before-you-sign-that-data-contract/#respond Fri, 07 Oct 2016 02:49:42 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1402 Oil & Gas Data Contracts The third quarter has come to a close. Next year’s budget is starting to take center stage. That being said, we’re all still concerned about ...

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Oil & Gas Data Contracts

The third quarter has come to a close. Next year’s budget is starting to take center stage. That being said, we’re all still concerned about what we can make out of this year. In a downturn like this, living to fight another day is the mentality. But there is something you should be thinking about as we turn into the final quarter of this year… contract renewals.

Most oil & gas data contracts automatically renew at the end of the contract term. The only way to stop the renewal is to cancel it before the contract ends. That’s not all though. Most of these contracts require a notification period to cancel. What this means is that if you wait too long to look at the contract, you’re stuck. Each contract is different. You can refer to the termination clause of your contract for specifics.

Why Contracts?

Companies might sell you on long term contracts as a way to lock in a price for the future. This is only useful when you’re working with a company who is notorious for raising prices each year. In reality contracts that lock you into a term do you no favors. We speak with customers who have signed 1, 2, or even 5 year contracts with some data providers. When we come to offer them the services they need for a fraction of the price, they are stuck and frustrated. At the end of the day these contracts serve to help the data providers lock you in. As many have told me, once you sign the contract you can kiss any decent customer service goodbye.

Data Without the Contract

WellDatabase was formed as a company that would bring modern technology and ideas to oil & gas. This includes axing the typical contract. All our plans are available month-to-month. We do offer discounts for an annual commitment, but you have the option. Several of our customers take advantage of our month-to-month plans. They only keep an active subscription while they need it. The great thing about WellDatabase is we maintain your saved data even if your subscription is not active. This means when you start your subscription back up everything is where you left it. This enables you to come and go as your business needs dictate.

What to do Now

If you contract is coming up for renewal, the best thing you can do is cancel it. Typically you will need to inform them in writing that you want to cancel at the end of the term. You can usually do this anytime within the contract period. There are several companies who can provide you with the service you need at a much better price. Worst case, you can get quotes and use them to negotiate your next contract. Whatever you do, do not just let it go. With oil prices where they are, you deserve better.

*Nothing in the blog should be considered legal advice. Please make sure to review your contracts with legal counsel before taking any actions.

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Section, Township, Range, Surveys, & Abstracts, oh my! http://welldatabase.com/blog/section-township-range-surveys-abstracts-oh-my/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/section-township-range-surveys-abstracts-oh-my/#respond Thu, 28 Aug 2014 02:53:48 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1405 The title is a mouthful, but we have added all the good stuff related to legal description searching. That’s not all though. We have added revolutionary tools to our mapping ...

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The title is a mouthful, but we have added all the good stuff related to legal description searching. That’s not all though. We have added revolutionary tools to our mapping interface that will change the way you look at oil & gas data. Like everything we do, there are no limits to what you can do with WellDatabase. Let’s dig in.

If you do not already have a WellDatabase account, be sure to sign up to follow along.

Searching the Land Grid

It’s no secret that the various survey systems in use can be a pain in the butt to deal with. That being said, most users we have talked to have a good understanding of the area they are working in. For this reason, we tried to make using the Land Grid search as straight forward as possible.

To get started, open up the filters panel and click the magnifying glass next to the Land Grid search option under the Geographic filter section.

This will open up the Land Grid dialog. Here you start with selecting the state you would like to search. The dialog defaults to the Section, Township, Range search. This is the most widespread legal description search used by the majority of the states in the US. For more information, check out the Public Land Survey System Wikipedia page.

Once you select your state, the available Townships for that state are automatically filtered in the drop down. Select a Township, and the available Range values are filtered as well.

At this point you can click the Add button and then update the search. This allows you to view all sections within the Township & Range selected. This is unique to WellDatabase and can be especially helpful when researching broad areas.

If we open the Land Grid search again, we can drill down further to select a specific Section. You will need to click the Add button again to add it to your search list. In this case, you will want to select the previous search value and click the Remove button to get the proper results.

 

With this search, the wells in the particular section are easily visible and you can dig into the details of each one as needed.

 

Searching by the legal descriptions is very useful, but it gets even better when you add overlays. If you click on the Tools button to the right and click the Add Map Overlay, you can select the Section – Township – Range overlay.

 

I also find it helpful to change the Base map setting at the top of the Tools section to empty if the map is looking too cluttered. There are additional options in the Base Map that are worth exploring as well. If you want a refresher on the map, read our blog – The WellDatabase Map.

 

Now we can clearly see the legal boundaries on the map with the well spots. This overlay can be particularly useful if there are questionable wells or if you want to broaden your search and see how neighboring wells are doing.

 

Zooming in and turning on the heat map for Oil production gives another interesting view of the wells in this section. Be sure to play with all the map tools. You will certainly get a unique look at the data.

 

What about Texas?

One of the beautiful things about our Land Grid search is it’s flexibility. Simply select Texas as your state and you are presented with Texas’ unique Survey – Block – Section – Abstract – Alt. Survey setup. The dropdowns work a little different for Texas as each one is filtered automatically as you select. For instance, If you select Ector county, all dropdowns are updated to the values available in Ector county. Selecting T&P RR CO as your survey likewise will filter the rest of the fields. This helps guide the search and make sure you find the data you need.

Just a quick side note about overlays again. Texas Surveys / Abstracts are a different layer than the Section – Township – Range. Be sure to open up the overlays again and turn on the Texas Surveys.

 

Applying the search above with the overlay gives use the following map.

 

If we zoom in, we see the abstract boundaries and the wells within.

 

But there’s More

The Land Grid search has been a highly requested feature, but we have added more. A significant number of users use WellDatabase to watch trends in permitting and drilling. While it’s easy to do a search between dates and see how the data looks, we thought we could do better.

Well Data Animation

Data animation allows users to specify a period of time, cumulative production amount, or well depth and animate the map as the system transverses through the values. Sounds kind of funny but is very easy to show; so let’s take a look.

Back in the tools menu there is a new Animate section. First we need to decide which field we would like to animate. For this demonstration, we will use Permit Date. When we click the play button, we are presented with the Animation Settings dialog.

First thing we do here is specify the date range we want to see in the animation. This animation will look at the wells in the abstract we searched on previously, permitted between 1/1/2008 and 1/1/2015. Next we pick the animation step. Since we are doing 7 years, we will pick the year as a step. Inclusive Animation defines whether the animation continues to add well spots as it goes through the date range or replaces the well spots with each step. A simple way to look at it is inclusive steps would look like 1/1/2008 – 1/1/2009, 1/1/2008 – 1/1/2010, 1/1/2008 – 1/1/2011, etc.. Non-inclusive steps would look like 1/1/2008 – 1/1/2009, 1/1/2009 – 1/1/2010, 1/1/2010 – 1/1/2011 and so on. Looping animation is pretty self-explanatory. Let’s see how this particular animation looks.

 

So that’s a pretty straight forward example, but we can see more interesting things by expanding our area. Let’s do the entire EagleFord area for the past 5 years as a non-inclusive animation. We’re also going to turn on the Shale Plays overlay in the map. Can’t forget the overlay.

Conclusion

We are very proud of the features we are adding to WellDatabase and hope you find them useful. We continue to listen to our customers and make the best product available. If you do not have a WellDatabase account, sign up for our free trial by going to https://app.welldatabase.com/signup.

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Ironman and Oil & Gas Software http://welldatabase.com/blog/ironman-and-oil-gas-software/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/ironman-and-oil-gas-software/#respond Fri, 25 Jul 2014 02:55:58 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1410 One of the more interesting comments I’ve heard about oil & gas software was in regards to being too easy to use. Typically something along the lines of they don’t ...

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One of the more interesting comments I’ve heard about oil & gas software was in regards to being too easy to use. Typically something along the lines of they don’t want to feel like a kindergartener could do the job. While I was surprised to read something like this, I began to noticed that it is the prevalent feeling in the industry. Users will brag about how they are able to do things with a particular system that nobody else can. They will complain about how difficult it is to work around oddities of a particular software, but then are hesitant to share that knowledge. The bottom line is that they believe that being able to get around in crappy software is a significant part of the value they provide and that’s pretty ridiculous.
Your kindergarten teacher knows better

Ironman 3

This particular phenomenon was on my mind the other night while we were watching Ironman 3. If you haven’t watched Ironman 3, it is better than 2 but not quite as good as the first. In Ironman 3, the newly renamed Iron Patriot is stolen from Lieutenant Colonel Rhodes and the bad guy flies off in it. My first thought is, how on earth did this guy know how to make this suit function. We know that there is a fair amount of voice control, but it would seem as though there is a significant portion of the control that is gesture based and some is just magic. Regardless, there is software powering this suit and the bad guy jumps in and uses it just fine. No training required. Off hand there’s not much to consider. It’s a movie. Later within that same movie though, the president is put into the suit and the suit is told to go to a particular location. The president apparently didn’t know how to use the suit and just went along for the ride. Just a stark contrast to the original bad guy who made the suit do what he wanted.

Why are we talking about this?

While I understand this is a movie, there is a point. Even if software is easy, it’s only as good as the user. The bad guy in the movie was ex-military and we assume he had some background in weapons, but no specific training on the Iron Patriot suit. Regardless, he was able to make the Iron Patriot suit do what he wanted. This ability points to the fact the the Iron Patriot software must have been intuitive and easy to use. Even with that fact, the president was not able to make the suit do anything at all. The moral of the story, software will not turn you into a superhero. You must already be a superhero, and software can help you be even better.

In photography it is often said that the camera gets in the way of the creative process. Great photographers can visualize the picture they want before they even pick the camera up. They understand their experience and vision make them great, not their equipment. The same can be said about oil & gas professionals and their software. A mediocre land man, geologist, or log analyst will not suddenly become great if they team up with great software. They will simply put out mediocre product more efficiently. However, the awesome land man, geologist, or log analyst will be able to create more awesome stuff with software that allows their brilliance to shine through. In other words, software is simply the vehicle for the user to show their expertise.

This is where oil & gas software has specifically gone wrong. Users have gotten used to software being so complex that it takes weeks of training and years of experience to become proficient. Understanding that software becomes a skill all its own. Understanding complex software does hold value but only because so many software packages are unnecessarily difficult. Holding on to the thought that a good portion of worth to a company is due to an understanding of software and not the understanding of the underlying principles is a mistake.

Looks like fun

So what now

It’s time for oil & gas software to get on board and start focusing on user interface. It’s time for new technologies to be implemented. It’s time for a fresh look at things. There is no reason software companies aren’t fixing this problem. If the software gets better, users will see that they spend less time fighting with their software and more time getting solutions to the people that matter. That is why WellDatabase has taken the approach we have. Our main objective is to get the user the data they need and stay out of their way. Most users will take the data they get from our systems and make something more from it. Our job is to make getting that data as easy as possible so users can get on to what makes them great. Their experience and knowledge.

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Android Application Launch & Giveaway http://welldatabase.com/blog/android-application-launch-giveaway/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/android-application-launch-giveaway/#respond Sat, 12 Jul 2014 03:23:33 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1415 We are thrilled to release WellDatabase for Android. To celebrate, we are giving away a 2nd generation 32GB Nexus 7 and one year of WellDatabase premium access. The Nexus 7 ...

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We are thrilled to release WellDatabase for Android. To celebrate, we are giving away a 2nd generation 32GB Nexus 7 and one year of WellDatabase premium access. The Nexus 7 is the highest rated Android tablet by Engadget.com. If you want to check out the full review on Engadget, go to http://www.engadget.com/products/asus/nexus/7/2nd-gen/.

The Contest

The prize is one 2nd generation Nexus 7.

Doing any of the following will get you one entry:

1. Tweet the following message “Check out the great #oil and #gas Android app from @WellDatabase. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.welldatabase.mobile #WellDatabase” OR tweet your favorite feature of WellDatabase with the #WellDatabase tag.

2. Follow us on twitter – https://twitter.com/welldatabase

3. Sign up for a WellDatabase account – https://app.welldatabase.com/signup

Obviously you can only signup for WellDatabase and follow us on Twitter once, but you can tweet about WellDatabase as much as you’d like (although only 1 per day will count as an entry).

The contest will last for a week and a half. We will announce the winner on Friday, June 20th.

The App

First and foremost, you can download WellDatabase for Android by clicking below.

 

 

We have been toiling away on the Android app for some time and we are very pleased with our product. We have aimed to keep a consistent interface with all our mobile apps and the Android app is right on track. While it is not identical to the iOS app, users can easily jump between them without issue.  Below are a few screenshots to show how great the Android app looks.

 

The mapping interface gives users instant and unlimited access to our database of over 4 million wells. Due to the Google integration, the map is nearly identical to what you see on our web app. You can also touch the location icon in the top right to jump right to your location and view nearby wells. No other app can do that.

 

 

 

 

Production charting on the Android app is great. The phone interface is very usable, but it’s the tablet interface that is pretty amazing. A real must have for anyone who needs to see data wherever they may be.

 

 

 

 

 

On top of having the data at your fingertips, you also have access to our database of well files and logs. The tiff images will require a separate tiff viewer application, but PDFs will be viewable natively. Here are a few tiff viewers if you need them:

Fast Image Viewer
Tiff Viewer
Multi Tiff Viewer

 

 

Of course the phone version offers the same great functionality, just a little more portable. Here are a few screenshots from it:

                              2014-05-22-18.42.51_thumb

Conclusion

We have worked very hard here at WellDatabase to make the best oil & gas applications possible. While we feel like our applications are second to none, we will continuously strive to improve everything we have to offer. We appreciate the thousands of users who have already downloaded WellDatabase for iOS. We look forward to opening up the world of WellDatabase to a whole new audience with our Android application.

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Exporting Datasets http://welldatabase.com/blog/exporting-datasets/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/exporting-datasets/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2013 03:26:17 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=1419 One of our biggest requests has been the ability to export data from our database to use in other software for further analysis. Fortunately, WellDatabase handles this in a very ...

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One of our biggest requests has been the ability to export data from our database to use in other software for further analysis. Fortunately, WellDatabase handles this in a very simple way. Below is a quick guide on how to export data from WellDatabase.

*A premium level subscription or higher is required to export data.

Creating Your Search

Our first step is to filter data down to get the dataset you are after. For our example, we will search all of the Yates wells in Andrews County, Texas. To make things easy, here is a link to the saved search.

 

Currently we limit the number of wells for export to 10,000, so we will need to filter our results down to below that number. The limit is solely for performance reasons as the export is created instantly. We will be adding the ability to export larger datasets in the near future, but it will be a process that the user will be able to request and then be notified when the export is ready. More on that later though.

Now we’ll jump over to the Table View to see the list of wells. The Table View button is at the top right of the map between Map View and Analytics. image

 

The table view shows that we have 422 wells returned for this particular search. We are under the 10,000 limit, so we can now export. For this example we will be exporting the entire dataset, but you can also select individual wells to export by simply clicking the checkbox next to the wells you are interested in and then clicking the Export Wells button. Again, we are exporting the entire dataset, so we will just go straight to clicking the Export Wells button without selecting any wells.

 

 

This brings up the Export Wells screen where we have our export options.

 

We can quickly see the confirmation of the number of wells we were expecting to be exported. The format defaults to PDF, but Excel, CSV, and Shape File are also available. Below that we have the column list. The columns to export defaults to API, Latitude, & Longitude, but users can easily add columns to the list by simply clicking in the column field and choosing the column you want from the dropdown.

 

If you want to bypass the column selection and have every column exported, you can check the box under Include All Columns. Once you have all the columns you are interested in and the format chosen, click Export. For our example, we have chosen API, Well Name, Latitude, Longitude, CUM Oil, CUM Gas, and CUM Water. Below are the files exported from this example:

Excel Export
CSV Export
ShapeFile Export

Conclusion

We have worked to make WellDatabase a world class data management and analysis tool, but there will always be situations where it is necessary to export the data into separate systems for a variety of reasons. At WellDatabase, we are more than happy to empower our customers with the ability to export the data to use how they see fit.

Larger dataset exports coming soon.

If you’re not already a WellDatabase user, sign up here and start using the map today.

As always, feel free to contact us at support@welldatabase.com with any questions or comments.

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The WellDatabase Map http://welldatabase.com/blog/the-welldatabase-map/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/the-welldatabase-map/#respond Thu, 24 Jan 2013 13:36:43 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=3682 In our previous posts we covered searching in both the web application and the mobile application. Today we are continuing with our series on using WellDatabase with an overview of ...

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In our previous posts we covered searching in both the web application and the mobile application. Today we are continuing with our series on using WellDatabase with an overview of the map.

Before we get started, if you have not signed up for WellDatabase yet, you can do so here. Then you can log in and follow along for yourself.

The WellDatabase map is the first map in the industry that allows you to view oil & gas information on a nationwide level. We are able to do this because of our proprietary data normalization process and utilization of the latest GIS technology.

 

When you open the map you can easily see the entire country with clusters on each state where data is available (Alaska is there, too. Just have to pan over to it.). Our database is growing every day and we expect to have several states coming online in the very near future. Now on to the details of the map.

Clusters

Our database holds millions of wells and in order to present that data in an useful format, we created a clustering system that groups wells by logical bounds. When you start the clusters are by state, but as you zoom in the clusters shift to counties/parishes and then to geographical areas. The clusters are also color coded and list the number of wells included to help spot trends more easily. Keep in mind that the data on map is limited to well information where location data is available. While this is the vast majority of wells, there are still some older wells that do not have location data. Those wells are viewable if you click on the List tab at the top.

      

Once you zoom in to a point where there are a manageable number of wells on the screen, the well spots themselves will appear. We defined this point as the place where users would be able to easily differentiate between well spots and actually select wells to view the detail. Limiting the level at which well spots are visible also allows the map to stay responsive. If you want to see well spots at a high level, you can do so by filtering the wells first to decrease the number of wells to be displayed. Searching for something like wells spudded in the past 12 months or only within a particular county will typically return a manageable amount of results that will allow us to show the actual well spots at any level. The well spots generally follow standard well symbols, but here is a legend just for clarity:

Oil Well
Gas Well
Oil And Gas Well
Gas Storage
Injection Well
Disposal Well
Test Well
Water Well
Sulfur Well
Unknown Well Type

Base Map Settings

By default the map opens with the Terrain base layer applied and nothing else. This particular view itself is unique and can be useful to operators, but most people will want to see some additional data on the map. This is where our different base maps and overlays come in. To start, you can access layers and all other map tools by clicking on the Tools button on the right side of the map.

The very first thing you may see is the gold marker icon at the top of the map tools. This button will take you to your current location on the map and drop a marker there for reference. This function will only work with hardware that is GPS capable.

 

The next tool section is the map settings. This is essentially the base map that you work with. The options are Map, Satellite, Hybrid, Terrain, and None. Below are examples of what each one looks like.

 

 

 

The Map option allows you to see well spots with roads, state boundaries, and water bodies.

 

 

 

The Satellite option shows you a simple satellite image. There are no boundaries or water bodies labeled on this map.

 

 

 

The Hybrid gives you a combination of the Satellite and Map options. This means you will see the satellite image with the items from the Map option on top.

 

 

The Terrain option shows the same items as the Map option, but adds in terrain views. This terrain view creates shadows to give depth and shows elevation lines in certain areas.

 

 

 

 

The None option allows you to hide all of the base layers and just see the well spots. This option is used primarily in conjunction with the overlays feature that we will discuss next.

 

Overlays

The overlays allow you to overlay map information on the map. You can add overlays to any of the map types listed above, but some of them can make seeing the overlay somewhat difficult. The screenshots below are all with the None option applied so that we can see the overlay more clearly. To add an overlay, open the Map Tools and click on the green + sign next to the Applied Map Overlays heading. The will pop up the overlays dialog where you can see all of the available overlays and select the ones you would like to add to the map. You can add as many overlays as you would like, but overlapping overlays can hide other overlay data if you are not careful. Fortunately you can order overlays to make sure you are getting the map you need. We will start with single overlays for now.

 

 

States – United States state boundaries.

 

 

 

Counties – County / Parish boundaries for the United States. Forgive us people in Louisiana, county is just more prominently used and we didn’t want to put county / parish everywhere.

 

 

PLSS – Public Land Survey System. Section, township, & range for those unfamiliar with the PLSS term. For more information, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Land_Survey_System

 

 

TXLS – Texas Land Survey. Texas has a very different survey system but those familiar with it will find this overlay immensely useful.

 

 

 

Shale Plays – Overlay of the well known shale plays in the United States.

 

 

 

Shale Basins – The well known shale basins in the United States.

 

 

 

 

Tight Plays – Well known tight plays in the United States.

 

 

 

Tight Basins – Well known tight basins in the United States.

 

 

 

 

Using multiple overlays is very easy to do as well. Simply check all the overlays you want and then you will be able to manage which order they appear in the well tools. For this example we have chosen Shale Plays and TXLS so we can look at the Eagle Ford a little closer. Once we select both of those, the map tools looks like this.

The resulting map can be seen below.

 

If you were to reorder the overlays (by clicking on the blue arrows) so that that TXLS overlay is above the Shale Plays overlay, the map tools looks like this.

 

The resulting map looks like this.

As you can see, the Shale Plays overlay is basically hidden behind the TXLS overlay. This is pretty easy to avoid, just mind the order of the overlays.

Heat Maps

The last feature in the map tools is one of the most unique as well. The heat map function allows you to create heat maps based on properties on the fly. This option is listed under the Display Options section and is defaulted to Well Spots. Once you change the value to Heat map then the dropdown below it becomes active and you can choose the property you would like to base the heat map on.

The heat map is pretty straightforward in that it simply maps out the relative values of the property picked for the visible area. That means that red is the highest value for the area you are looking at and then it moves to yellow to green to no color as the value decreases. In our example, we will stay in the Eagle Ford area, leave the TXLS and Shale Plays overlays on and switch on the heat map. The first view is the default heat map based on Total Wells.

This clearly shows where the wells are and where they are not. Now you can quickly contrast that map with the CUM Oil map below.

You can easily see that the oil production is more concentrated to the north. If we then switch over to the CUM Gas map…

You can see that the wells to the south look to be producing more gas.

You can also use Total Depth and CUM Water as heat map values.

Conclusion

As you can see, our maps at WellDatabase provide a unique user experience that you won’t find anywhere else. When pairing our map tools with our searching capabilities, there is no limit to how you can visualize your data.

If you’re not already a WellDatabase user, sign up here and start using the map today.

As always, feel free to contact us at support@welldatabase.com with any questions or comments.

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Searching WellDatabase iOS Application http://welldatabase.com/blog/searching-welldatabase-ios-application/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/searching-welldatabase-ios-application/#respond Wed, 16 Jan 2013 01:24:35 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=3686 Our WellDatabase iOS app has become one of the most successful oil & gas applications in the Apple App Store. There are several nice oil & gas applications out there, ...

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Our WellDatabase iOS app has become one of the most successful oil & gas applications in the Apple App Store. There are several nice oil & gas applications out there, but nothing that even comes close to what WellDatabase is doing. If you have an iPad, iPhone, or even an iPod touch, you can use the link below to download WellDatabase.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/welldatabase/id553328644?mt=8

WellDatabase is free to download and just like the site, the different subscription levels will allow you access to different amounts of data. Currently you must sign up on our website before you will be able to access the iOS application. That will be changing shortly with our next release. In the meantime, jump over to https://app.welldatabase.com/signup to create your account.

Our last blog covered searching WellDatabase through the web interface. If you missed it, I highly recommend you go here to read it. This post will cover searching in the iOS application. We have worked hard to create a fluid interface that allows users to easily transition between mobile devices and the web application. Just like we covered in the previous post, WellDatabase offers a massive amount of data and creating a search interface that allows users to easily search our extensive database was a challenge. We gladly accepted this challenge and what we came up with allows users to search for data like never before. This blog will cover both the iPhone and iPad versions of the app since they are using a very similar searching mechanism. There will be plenty screenshots of both.

Getting Started

Much like the web application, the iOS app drops you right into the map view. Here you’ll notice the familiar iOS maps interface with our well clusters. In the map view you can use all the normal gestures you have come to know with Apple devices. You can also touch any cluster or well spot to see the information about whatever it is that you have touched. Touching the blue arrow will zoom you into the cluster you have touched or take you to the well detail in the case of touching a well spot. You can easily dig through the data by simply zooming into a location and viewing the well spots, but filtering will allow you to get a more direct look at exactly what you are searching for.

On To the Filters

To open the filters touch the Search button on the top right of the title bar. This will slide out the filter list. On the iPad the filter list only takes up a portion of the screen, allowing you to maintain view of what you currently have up on the map. The iPhone version on the other hand takes up the width of the screen due to the smaller size. All WellDatabase screens will take advantage of the new iPhone 5’s larger, 4 inch screen.

The filter panel contains most of the same filters from the web application, grouped in the same fashion. Now before we move on to the filters, we are going to take a second to look a the features of the filter panel.

Special Features

At the very top of the filter panel, you will see Search and Cancel buttons. The Search button will execute the search based on the current filters and hide the filter panel. The Cancel button will simply hide the filter panel. All of the filters you may have setup will still be there and can be accessed by touching the Search button again, but the filters will not have been applied to the map.

Directly below that is the Saved Searches section. This unique feature allows you to save filters once you have them set. One of the best things about this feature is that your saved searches are automatically synced between the iOS application and the web portal. To that point, all of your settings and saved items are immediately sync’d between the applications.

If you touch Saved Search the row will expand and you will have a text box that says “Touch to pick search” as well as a small document icon with an arrow. Touching the text box will pop up a selector to pick from any existing saved searches you may have. The image on the left is the iPad pop-over and the right is the iPhone.

                     

You can now select any of the saved searches and touch the Load button to load the filters from that particular saved search. Touching the Cancel button will cancel out the dialog and bring you back to the filter panel. If you already have a saved search selected, you can touch the Clear button to clear out any currently loaded filters.

If you touch the document icon with the arrow, you will be given the option to save your current filters for later use. If you are creating a new filter, the only option is to Save Search As. This will give you a prompt to name the search and then save it to your saved search list.  If you happen to have an existing filter set selected, you will be given the option overwrite your search by touching Save Search. From here you will also be able to delete the selected search by touching the Delete Search option.

Filter Types

If you read the previous blog, you might already be aware of the types of searches available in WellDatabase. Those same search types exist in the iOS application and we will go over the basics of the types of searches before looking at the actual filters available in the iOS application.

One special item in regard to the filters available in the iOS application. When you initially look at the filter panel, there are no text boxes, date selectors, or anything other than the list of filters. In order to use the filter, you simply touch the filter you wish to use and you will be presented with the appropriate interface for that filter.

The first type is the general text field. These fields allow for any input and perform a wildcard search. Just like the web application, these searches test the field to see if the value you typed exists anywhere in the value. For example, typing 42135 in the API search, you will get wells that start with 42135 (Andrews Co., TX) as well as the WAGGONER, J & J -C- 19 well in Wichita Co, TX since its API is 4248542135.

The second type of filter is the range filter. Range filters can be either numerical ranges or date ranges. To use a numerical range you’ll need to type the value you want in each box and then touch the Save button. This will set the filter but the search will not execute until you touch the Search button at the top.

              

Of course to edit this filter, you simply touch the filter row and the textboxes reappear.To remove the filter you will need to delete both of the values and touch the Save button.

Date filter work essentially the same way except when you touch the textbox, you are presented with a date selector. Again the iPad version allows for popups on the filter panel while the iPhone version requires the screen to swap to the date selector. To pick a date from the date selector, you can scroll to the desired date and touch the Save button. Touching the Cancel button will hide the picker and take you back to the filter panel. In order to remove any date values already set you will need to touch the Clear button in the date picker. This will remove the date from the field and it will not affect search results.

All range filters will allow you to specify one or both values in the range. If you want to see all wells spudded since 1/1/2012, you just need to put that date in the left box and leave the right empty. If you wanted wells spudded before 1/1/2012, you would put that date in the right box. It’s essentially just a “from” and “to” box..

The third type is a simple data check. If you touch any of these  rows, a checkmark will appear in the row indicating that the filter is in place. To remove the check, touch the field again. An example is Has Production where the search will return only wells that have production data within WellDatabase.

 

The last and most unique type of filter in the iOS application is the multi-select. The multi select allows you to select multiple values to search for a particular filter. This comes in handy when selecting counties, states, well types, operators, and many more. This is also the filter that differs most between the iPad and iPhone versions of the app, so we’ll go over each one individually here.

iPad

To get started, just touch the filter you are interested in. For this example, we will use the Operator. Once you touch the Operators item, the Select Operators dialog appears. Here you have a textbox at the top for searching, a list on the left for available choices and a list on the right for selected choices. To start searching, type in the first few characters of the operator you are looking for. In this example, we will go ahead and type out Chesapeake. Once we do that and touch Search, we get a list of matches on the left side. You can easily scroll this list and find the operator name or names you are looking for. Operators can be especially tricky since the state agencies tend to have several variations of a particular operator. WellDatabase does not attempt to alter this data in any way.

Once you find the operator name you would like to filter on, touch it and then touch the Add button. This will move the operator into the list on the right side. You can move as many values to the right list as you would like and it will find all wells that exist for any of the values selected. You can also change the value in the textbox and search for additional options to add to the filter. Once you have all the options you are interested in, you can just touch the Update button and the multi-select dialog will go away and you will be back at the filter panel. The filter you used will now list all of the selected options in the filter panel so you can easily see your current criteria. If you would like to remove options, you can touch the filter again to bring up the multi-select dialog. There you can see the current values again in the right list. Touch the one you want to remove and then touch the Remove button. It will move it back over to the available list where you can quickly re-add the value if you have removed it by accident.

iPhone

The iPhone version of the multi-select is very similar, but a little different due to the screen size. When you touch the filter, it will open directly to a search screen with a textbox at the top. At the bottom you will notice the tabs for Selected and Search. If you wish to immediately cancel out of this search, you will need to touch the Selected tab first and then touch the Cancel button. Since we are going to use this filter, we will continue on. Just like in the iPad, we will type in Chesapeake and touch Search on the keyboard. This will  bring back the list of available options. In the iPhone version, you simply touch the values you want to use and they will disappear from the available list and will be moved to the selected list. This is easily viewable by touching the Selected tab. You can freely switch between the tabs and add as many values as you need. If you want to remove an item from the selected list you can swipe on the value you want to remove and a Delete button will appear. Touching the Delete button will immediately remove the option from the selected list.

                   

When you are finished, touch the Save button on the Selected tab and you will be brought back to the filter panel with the items listed for the filter. If you want to remove items from the filter then you can touch the filter again to show the multi-select dialog, go to the Selected tab, and swipe on any values you wish to remove.

The iPhone version does require a few more steps but still provides a simple, easy to use interface for searching through millions of records on a handheld device.

 

Now that we have covered the basics on searching on the iOS application, we can go over the actual filters available. Our web application is where a lot of our main research and development happens, so some filters will be available on the web application and not on the mobile app. These filters will be caught up in the next release and will match the web application filters. Just a warning, these descriptions will be the same as the ones listed in the previous blog.

General

The General section contains the most common data about a well. Nearly every well in our database contains these items and can be searched.

Total Depth – This value is typically the Drill Depth, but in some areas the Log Depth is all that is available. In that case, the Total Depth is equal to the Log Depth as it is the only depth marker available for the well.

API – The well API number. API ranges between 10 and 14 digits with no dashes. All searches are wildcard searches.

Well Name – The name of the well. Many times this is comprised of a well or lease name and well number, but even that can vary from state to state. As with API, all searches are wildcard searches.

Current Operators – The operator currently listed by the state agencies.

Well Statuses – The status given to a well by the state agencies. These statuses can be tricky due to the fact that states vary widely on how they define the status of a well. If you are unsure which status applies to the area you are looking at, try to look at some of the well details in the state or states you are interested in. This filter is a multi-select, so you can choose as many options as you would like to make sure your search is complete.

Well Types – Well types are the only field that we normalize so that it is more standard across our entire dataset. The well detail will show the original type from the state, but the search allows you to filter by a more generic list of well types (Oil, Gas, Injection, etc.)

Geographic

The geographic section pulls together all searchable items that have to do with location. These filters work extremely well with the map interface and allow you to search in ways never before possible.

States and Counties – Simply the state and county that the state agency has marked the well as being in. Just a warning, this doesn’t always match the API number as it should, but again, it is what the state agency reported with their data.

Fields – The field marked for a particular well. Most states just establish a simple field name for reference, but others may have more to it. For example, Texas will typically add the producing horizon on the field name.

Dates

The Dates section is very helpful for determining activity within a particular date range. Once again, states vary widely on the dates they provide. The most commonly provided date is the Spud Date, but the other choices are provided by several states as well. With the date filters you have to remember that if the well doesn’t have that particular date, it will not show up in the search regardless of the range specified.

Each of the dates available are pretty simple dates that nearly all wells have the ability to have. The key is simply if the state reports those dates or not.

Available Data

This section is one of the easiest and most useful filters we provide in WellDatabase. With a single click, you can filter to wells that have logs, have production, or even core data. As you can imagine, this kind of quick filtering will allow you to easily weed out wells that do not have the data you find helpful.

Conclusion

WellDatabase is the first mobile app to offer the ability to search for oil & gas wells across the entire country. There is honestly nothing even close to it in the App Store. Just as with the site, there were a lot of challenges to make this happen. While there are some nuances to our searching, overall it is a simple and intuitive interface designed specifically for mobile devices.

Be on the lookout for our future updates to the iOS app and a new Android app coming soon. We plan to continue pushing the limits of what you can do on a mobile device with our data and providing an unbeatable product.

If you’re not already a WellDatabase user, sign up here and start creating your filters.

As always, feel free to contact us at support@welldatabase.com with any questions or comments.

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Searching WellDatabase http://welldatabase.com/blog/searching-welldatabase/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/searching-welldatabase/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2013 01:40:40 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=3690 Over the past few months, we have received a good amount of questions in regard to searching WellDatabase. We understand some of the confusion given that the site is so ...

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Over the past few months, we have received a good amount of questions in regard to searching WellDatabase. We understand some of the confusion given that the site is so vastly different from anything else out there. We wanted to take some time to write this post all about searching WellDatabase. For the purposes of this blog, we will be focusing exclusively on the map searching. We do have ways to search through aggregated data such as Operators, Fields, Counties, Producing Horizons, etc., but we will go into detail about that in another post.

Getting Started

The map is the center of our data searching. While we do have a dashboard that provides a quick and easy look at your data, the map is where we explore. Non-premium users are actually always dropped directly into the map. If you are a premium subscriber and you are on your dashboard, simply click on the Wells link under the Browse section.

Once you are on the map, the filters can be accessed by clicking on the Filters tab on the left of the screen.

     

 

Our list of filters has grown over time so they are now broken up into sections. We will break up each section to dive into the detail. Before we do that though, we are going to cover the special features within our filters panel and the types of filters we offer.

Filters Panel Features

The filters panel has a few unique features that are very helpful. Here’s a quick rundown of what they are.

The first icon is the save button. Once you have a filter set you are happy with, you can simply click the save button and you will be presented with a dialog with saving options. Here you can choose to overwrite an existing saved search or create a new one with a new name. If you are a subscriber with the Ultimate package, you will have the option to save the search to your saved searches or to any projects you may be a part of. Adding the search to the project shares it with all other members of your project.

The drop down to the right is where you can recall saved searches. It always starts with New in the field because the very first filter it opens to is a new, non-saved filter. If you have saved filters in the past, clicking on the list will show you all of the saved searches you have. When you select one of your saved searches, a link to Load the search will appear to the right. When you click the link, you will get an alert telling you that you will be clearing the current filters and loading the selected saved search. We do this just because the last thing we want is for our users to accidently lose a search they have been working on. Clicking ok on this alert will automatically load all the filter options from the saved search and execute the search.

In between the save icon and the dropdown, there is a small green icon. Clicking this icon will enable you to share the current search with anyone you like, even users without a WellDatabase account. When you click the share button, you get a dialog where you can set the search a name and small description. This is used to describe what the search shows when non-WellDatabase users open it. Once you give the  search a name and description and click the Create button, you are given a link to the search. This link can be emailed, tweeted, posted on blogs, social networking sites, or just about anywhere. Users without a WellDatabase account can view these searches and interact with the map, but will not be able to further filter or utilize any other WellDatabase tools.

Executing the Search

At the bottom of the filter panel are the base options for executing a search and clearing filters.

Nearly every filter you enter will not update the results on the map until you click the Search button. The Clear link clears all filters that are currently set. It will pop up with a warning before clearing them. Again, we don’t want users to lose their work.

Filter Types

Before we get on to the specific filters, we want to run over the five distinct types of filters (not including the Area of Interest, which we’ll talk about specifically later).

The first type is the general text field. Each of these fields allow for queries to simply be typed in. There is no limit to what you can enter into these text fields and each text field will do a wildcard search. That is, it will find all complete and partial matches. For example, searching the API field for 42135 will bring back all the wells in Andrews Co, TX as well as the WAGGONER, J & J -C- 19 well in Wichita Co, TX since its API is 4248542135. Basically if your search is anywhere in the value, it will come back.

The second type is a numeric range. These fields allow for only numeric input and return all wells where the criteria specified falls within the range specified. These filter types are specific to items with numeric values such as depth and production numbers.

The third type is a date range. As you would expect, these fields only allow date values and return data where the well’s value falls between the dates specified. Leaving one of the dates empty will cause the filters to ignore the blank value and do a sooner than or later than date depending on which date you fill out. For the example on the left, it will return wells spudded since 1/1/2012 (including the 1st) and the right, wells spudded on or before 1/1/2012.

The fourth type is a simple data check. It is a checkbox and if checked, it will return only wells where that particular type of data is available. An example is Has Production where the search will return only wells that have production data within WellDatabase.

The final main type of filter is a multi-select. These types of fields will allow you to search the available choices for the filter and select as many of the choices as you like. These filters are important for filters that have many choices and need to be whittled down before you can select what you would like to filter (i.e.. operators, fields, counties/parishes, etc.).

Multi-select filters are shown in the filter panel with the filter name and a find link next to it. When you click on the find link, you are presented with the multi-select dialog. Here you have a text field at the top for searching the available choices for the current filter. Below that there are two list boxes. If you start typing in the textbox, it will automatically bring back results into the left list box. In this example, you can see a number of results when we simply type “chesa” into the search box.Given the different ways companies names end up in state systems, this select allows you to see all the variations and helps ensure your search is bringing back what you want. In this example, Chesapeake Operating is listed as Chesapeake Operating Inc, Chesapeake Operating Inc., and Chesapeake Operating, Inc.. While it might seem a little strange to have these minor variations, this is the data that comes directly from the state agencies and we do not want to alter it in any way. This type of search allows you to see all of the possible variations and make the right search. You can now click on each choice you want to add to your filter and click the Add button to move it to the right list box. You can also hold the ctrl key and click to select multiple choices. Clicking add will then add each of the selected items to the right list. Once you have all the items you wish to search for, simply click the Update button on the bottom right to update your filters. Once you do that, the search immediately fires off and you are presented with the results on the map.

After items are defined in the multi-select, the filter panel lists each of the choices and gives you the option of removing them from the search by simply clicking the x next to it. Again, clicking the x will fire off the search immediately.

Now that we have covered the basics, we will go on to the sections of the filter panel in detail.

General

The General section contains the most common data about a well. Nearly every well in our database contains these items and can be searched.

Total Depth – This value is typically the Drill Depth, but in some areas the Log Depth is all that is available. In that case, the Total Depth is equal to the Log Depth as it is the only depth marker available for the well.

API – The well API number. API ranges between 10 and 14 digits with no dashes. All searches are wildcard searches.

Well Name – The name of the well. Many times this is comprised of a well or lease name and well number, but even that can vary from state to state. As with API, all searches are wildcard searches.

Current Operators – The operator currently listed by the state agencies.

Well Statuses – The status given to a well by the state agencies. These statuses can be tricky due to the fact that states vary widely on how they define the status of a well. If you are unsure which status apply to the area you are looking at, try to look at some of the well details in the state or states you are interested in. This filter is a multi-select, so you can choose as many options as you would like to make sure your search is complete.

Well Types – Well types are the only field that we normalize so that it is more standard across our entire dataset. The well detail will show the original type from the state, but the search allows you to filter by a more generic list of well types (Oil, Gas, Injection, etc.)

Geographic

The geographic section pulls together all searchable items that have to do with location. These filters work extremely well with the map interface and allow you to search in ways never before possible.

Custom Area of Interest – This filter will allow you to draw an area on the map and filter the wells to just ones contained in the area. You can combine this search with any other filters as well. Once you click on the create button, you get a small toolbar on the map that will allow you to toggle between panning the map and drawing your area. To draw your area of interest, simply click as many times as you’d like and then finish by clicking it back to your starting point. It will then automatically filter the wells down to the area selected and highlight that area as well.

States and Counties – Simply the state and county that the state agency has marked the well as being in. Just a warning, this doesn’t always match the API number as it should, but again, it is what the state agency reported with their data.

Fields – The field marked for a particular well. Most states just establish a simple field name for reference, but others may have more to it. For example, Texas will typically add the producing horizon on the field name.

Shale Play Bounds – Our database contains a geographical boundary for the most popular shale plays. This filter allows you to utilize those boundaries to filter your search and will work for the entire play, even if it crosses state borders.

Production

Production data is easily one of the most useful pieces of well data available. If a well does not have production data, that does not necessarily mean that the well hasn’t produced anything. It simply means that the state agency does not report any production for that well. Typically production data is available anywhere from 2 to 6 months after the production period. The filters for the production section are:

CUM Oil (BBL), CUM Gas (MCF), CUM Water (BBL) – Each of these filters allow you to query for cumulative production of either oil, gas or water.

Horizons – The producing horizon, if noted. This is the formation in which the well has registered production. This particular field is very hit or miss in regard to what the state reports. That being said, WellDatabase is the one place you can search multiple states over a particular production horizon. A good example is the Bakken Shale in North Dakota and Montana. In the geographic filters you could filter on wells that lie inside the boundary of the Bakken, but the horizon filter will allow you to nail down exactly which wells have produced out of the Bakken.

Dates

The Dates section is very helpful for determining activity within a particular date range. Once again, states vary widely on the dates they provide. The most commonly provided date is the Spud Date, but the other choices are provided by several states as well. With the date filters you have to remember that if the well doesn’t have that particular date, it will not show up in the search regardless of the range specified.

Each of the dates available are pretty simple dates that nearly all wells have the ability to have. The key is simply if the state reports those dates or not.

 

Available Data

This section is one of the easiest and most useful filters we provide in WellDatabase. With a single click, you can filter to wells that have logs, have production, or even core data. As you can imagine, this kind of quick filtering will allow you to easily weed out wells that do not have the data you find helpful.

Conclusion

WellDatabase is the first site to provide the ability to search for wells across the entire country. In doing this, we had a lot of technical challenges that we had to overcome in regard to managing the amount and variety of data. Our final product is one that allows you to search for oil & gas information like never before. The filters may be a little complex at first, but once you walk through it, it actually becomes quite easy. Most users end up searching for data in ways they never have before simply because it was never available like this. We hope that taking the time to read this blog will clarify any questions about our filters and allow you to get the most out of WellDatabase.

If you’re not already a WellDatabase user, sign up here and start creating your filters.

As always, feel free to contact us at support@welldatabase.com with any questions or comments.

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iPhone Application Launch & Giveaway http://welldatabase.com/blog/iphone-application-launch-giveaway/ http://welldatabase.com/blog/iphone-application-launch-giveaway/#respond Sat, 03 Nov 2012 01:54:26 +0000 http://welldatabase.com/?p=3692 Today we are happy to announce that our iPhone application is live and in the app store. The iPad application has been downloaded hundreds of times in the few short ...

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Today we are happy to announce that our iPhone application is live and in the app store. The iPad application has been downloaded hundreds of times in the few short weeks it has been out and we hope to see iPhone users embrace the app in a similar fashion.

Out of pure coincidence, we are releasing on the day that people are getting their iPad minis delivered. As it would happen, we ordered one extra so that we could give it away to celebrate our latest release. On top of that, we’re throwing in one year of our Premium services. That means unlimited searches, production results, well files, well logs, and more. See more about our Premium package here.  So before we take a quick look at the new iPhone app, let’s go over how to get your name in this drawing.

The Contest

The prize is one 16GB iPad Mini Wi-Fi only. Doing any of the following will get you one entry.

1. Tweet the following message “Check out the great #oil and #gas IOS app (iPhone & iPad) from @WellDatabase. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/welldatabase/id553328644?mt=8 #WellDatabase” OR tweet your favorite feature of WellDatabase with the #WellDatabase tag.

2. Follow us on twitter – https://twitter.com/welldatabase

3. Like us on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/WellDatabase

4. Sign up for a WellDatabase account – https://app.welldatabase.com/signup

Obviously you can only signup for WellDatabase, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook once, but you can tweet about WellDatabase as much as you’d like (although only 1 per day will count as an entry).

The contest will last for 1 week and we will announce the winner on Friday, November 9th. Good luck to all.

The App

Those familiar with our iPad app will notice a consistent look and feel with the new iPhone app. Of course the change in form factor requires some interface changes to make things fit nicely, but the look and the feel remains consistent. Here are a few screenshots of the application and the features we’re had in our iPad version:

New Features

While we were working on getting everything on the iPhone we decided to add some new features for both the iPhone and iPad. Now you can view production charts full screen, view satellite and hybrid maps with the well spots, and print maps using AirPrint enabled printers. Perhaps the coolest feature is the ability to show your location on the map and even have the map follow you and continually update the wells in your vicinity. There have been some others that have tried at this, but give ours a shot and you’ll see how vastly superior it really is.

We are leaving this part to the end on purpose since it’s not really exciting. Due to Apple’s overly restrictive app store policies, we have had to remove the create account button from our app. Even though we were not charging to create an account on mobile devices, we were not allowed to give users access to create an account. Therefore if you are new to WellDatabase, you will have to sign up at https://app.welldatabase.com/signup before using the iPhone app. We apologize for the inconvenience and will continue to work with Apple on trying to include this functionality directly in our application.

Conclusion

We are absolutely thrilled with the pace the iPad app has been downloaded and are equally excited about the new iPhone app. Be sure to enter the contest for the iPad Mini and as always contact us if you have any question or comments.

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